Tag Archives: 1969 White Paper

‘Paying for the Truth’

The Aboriginal Industry works hard at silencing opposition, and a courageous Canadian Senator is their latest victim:

“Sen. Lynn Beyak, known for {correctly} defending residential schools as “well-intentioned”, has been kicked out of the ‘Conservative’ caucus after she refused to remove “racist” comments {letters of support from Canadians} posted to her Senate website.

“Beyak had posted roughly 100 letters in support of her earlier defence of residential schools…to her Senate website {Excerpts and link at bottom of post}.

“In a statement, ‘Conservative’ Leader Andrew Scheer said he found out about the letters on Tuesday and asked Beyak to remove some of the comments, but she refused… Continue reading ‘Paying for the Truth’

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‘Appeasing Racial Nationalists’

“It is fashionable to blame the myriad of social pathologies rampant on many reserves on colonialism, residential schools, poverty, etc., but the real cause is never admitted: segregation.

“In demonizing assimilation (as if the virtue of social integration after Martin Luther King Jr wasn’t obvious), aboriginal nationalists legitimized segregation.”

–Michael MelansonERBLAppeasingRacialNationalists800x800I dislike nationalists, and racial and ethnic nationalists most of all. Aboriginal nationalism is racial nationalism and Derek Nepinak has been trying to advance that for some time now. He lives in a suburban home with a salary paid by the Government of Canada and is supposed to represent Manitoba’s chiefs (64 or so). No one asks Nepinak what nationhood for a remote reserve like Pauingassi actually means and it’s clear below that Nepinak hasn’t thought out what aboriginal “nationhood’ means in general. It’s like fertilizing the lawn with gasoline before a lightning storm.  Continue reading ‘Appeasing Racial Nationalists’

‘Aboriginal Peoples Still Haunted By The Past’

“This gap between narrative of self-government and reality — between memory of what once was a long time ago and what is today — reflects what I call the “dream palace” of the aboriginals…

“Today’s reality, however, is so far removed in actual day-to-day terms from the memories inside the dream palace, as to be almost unbearable…” 

ERBLAboriginalPeoplesStillHauntedByThePast800x800{This is an edited transcript of a talk that Jeffrey Simpson, the national affairs columnist for the Globe and Mail, gave at McGill U. in 2014.} Continue reading ‘Aboriginal Peoples Still Haunted By The Past’

Why End Race Based Law?

Canadians believe in equality, that all men and women have equal rights. We have determined that all shall be treated fairly and that no one shall be shut out of Canadian life, and especially that no one shall be shut out because of his, or her, race.

Only a policy based on this belief can enable Canadians of Aboriginal heritage to realize their needs and aspirations.

Native Aboriginal relations with other Canadians began with special treatment by government and society, and special treatment has been the rule since Europeans first settled in Canada. Special treatment has made of the Aborignals a community disadvantaged and apart.
Obviously, the course of history must be changed.

The changes proposed recognize the simple reality that the separate legal status of Aboriginals, and the policies which have flowed from it, have kept the Aboriginal people apart from, and behind, other Canadians. The treatment resulting from their different status has often been worse, sometimes equal and occasionally better than that accorded to their fellow citizens.
What matters is that it has been different.

We can no longer perpetuate the separation of Canadians.
Now is the time to change. 

Continue reading Why End Race Based Law?